Disability discrimination often occurs during the hiring process

Under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), workers at most businesses have the right to expect accommodations for disabling medical conditions. Whether they need wheelchair access to a facility or computer access accommodations because of vision problems, their employers should try to help support them.

Given that hiring workers with medical needs can sometimes result in added costs for the company, some businesses will still try to get away with discriminatory employment practices to keep their costs low. Disability discrimination can easily impact someone’s attempt to secure a new job.

Did your offer disappear when you met the interviewer?

Finding a job that fits your skillset is an exciting moment. You know that you would be a beneficial addition to the company’s staff and that the job would be a positive change for you.

You submit your resume online and soon hear back from someone in management, human resources or recruiting. They review your skills and talk with you over the phone to verify that you might be a good fit for the company. They imply that you have a job offer pending a successful interview.

Then, when you show up for the interview, the entire mood changes. The interviewer looks at your wheelchair and becomes hostile or noncommittal. Your job offer disappears despite there being no changes in your background. You may be able to hold the company responsible for discriminating against you because of your disability — especially if you have written evidence that the company had extended an offer to you and then later rescinded it.

Fighting disability discrimination will help you seek justice for yourself protect and also help other applicants with disabilities who may hope to work at that company in the future.