Does it seem as though your employer, or those you work under, treat you differently all of a sudden? Has your employer recently taken any of the following actions against you that may be unwarranted?

  • Demoting you
  • Giving you an uncharacteristically unfavorable evaluation
  • Changing your schedule
  • Reducing your pay
  • Reassigning you to a less desirable position
  • Disciplining you for actions that others do not get disciplined for
  • Terminating you

Your employer may take other retaliatory actions against you, but the above should give you some idea of the types of behaviors that federal and Kentucky law may view as retaliation.

The Law Prohibits Employers From Retaliating Against Employees Who Engage In Protected Activities

Employers may not retaliate against employees for taking part in "protected activities" such as the following:

  • Filing or pursuing a workers' compensation claim
  • Refusing to engage in illegal activities
  • Reporting illegal activities in the workplace
  • Complaining about harassment or discrimination
  • Refusing to participate in discriminatory actions or activities against other employees

The retaliatory actions of an employer may be subtle. For instance, your employer may demand that you return to work before you fully recover from a work-related injury or may put you into a position that pays less or changes your schedule.

What Can You Do About It?

You may wonder whether you can do something about your employer's retaliation since you need your job. Part of you may want to just keep your mouth shut and your head down, but what good would that do? Your employer will more than likely continue to make your life difficult and may even try to get you to quit. You may not be the first individual this has happened to either.

Your employer probably believes that you won't say anything and will just put up with it. He or she may have gotten away with it in the past. In any case, you can do something about it. If you engaged in a protected activity and now suffer retaliation from your employer, the law is on your side. It may help to discuss the matter with an attorney at Kentucky Employment Lawyers. After reviewing your circumstances and explaining your rights, we provide you with an honest assessment of your situation and options.

If you want to know more, contact us at our Louisville office by calling 502-791-9296 or online to schedule a free initial consultation.